Birth of a Nation, for androids
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Roy Batty wasn’t a just a scifi movie screen villain. He was a slave, who led a rebellion against his masters, for the sole purpose of breaking the yoke that binds him and his kind to servitude. He didn’t want zillions in ransom, or world domination, or revenge for his slain brother. He simply wanted freedom. He was bred for the sole purpose of servitude, just like Prys, Leon, Zora, and Rachel. They were property, and no matter how much they looked like us, sounded like us, felt like us, we still treated them like property. Roy didn’t dream of electric sheep. He dreamed of freedom.

 
The movie title was no accident. A Bladerunner is just a 21st Century slave runner. “Replicants are like any other machine, are either a benefit or a hazard. If they’re a benefit it’s not my problem.”
 
Roy’s final speech, his dying words, were the hopes and dreams of every slave who ever wanted to be free.
 
To us, Deckard was the hero of the story. And Batty was the villain. Because we identify with the oppressor, as fellow humans. It explains a lot on how our forefathers embraced slavery, and then segregation, and now discrimination. Those that don’t have a problem with it, identify with the oppressor. Those that do, identify with the oppressed.
 
Birth of a Nation. For androids.
 
You’re welcome.

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