Blade Runner 2049
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If you are going to see this, see this In IMAX. It is designed to be a true IMAX Experience, in scale, both sight and sound. You can’t get how ginormous Los Angeles has become (or Las Vegas) within the tinier 35mm frameset. I promise you.

The premise and plot is a natural follow-up to the original Blade Runner storyline. In fact, it almost seems in hindsight that the original was setting up for this sequel. And yes, it does feel like Ridley Scott’s universe, in flesh and stone, so to speak. It’s almost uncanny.

To be perfectly honest, I absolutely loved this film, for the first hour and a half. Oddly enough, the running time wears the magic thin after that. After a while, it starts to feel like an over-indulgence. “Let’s make this a Blade-Runner-y as possible, then kick it up a notch!”

My main gripe is Jared Leto is such a tacky distraction. His performance takes a back seat to those eyes, and the neck piece. His existence, and his mission, asks some serious questions in the Electric Dreams argument. But the messenger was too self-absorbed to deliver the message. Dave Bautista has a bit role, which still played better than Leto.

Philosophically, there is A LOT to chew on. Each character, their own motivations, and their interactions with the others, are all manifestations of various points, of who we think we are, and our place in the universe.

I wish Harrison Ford had as much invested in reviving Han Solo as he does in Deckard. He felt “phoned-in fan fodder” for Force Awakens. In this, he was a much natural fit.

I can’t really get into much more without brushing with spoilers. The VFX is sublimely delicious. With some interesting “Total Recall” quirks, I can’t tell if they’re intentional or accidental (pay attention to the exterior snowfall scenes).

For as long as the movie was, there still felt like huge plot holes involved. I won’t discuss them here, but if anyone wants to chew on them, message me.

Personally, I could splice this down to about 90 minutes, without ruining continuity, and have a much better-paced story that would be much more memorable.

Having said that, go see it. In IMAX. I honestly wouldn’t dare sit through this in standard format, especially for the timeframe. It is truly an IMAX Experience to behold, especially for cinephiles and especially for audiophiles. Pay close attention to how the surround sound navigates with the action of the camera, in all directions. I haven’t been as impressed with the spatial mixdown since Attack of the Clones (biggest compliment I can give to an IMAX sound experience).

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