Kentucky shooting was 3rd at a U.S. school this week
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11th mass shooting this year? It’s not even February. I didn’t even know about the other ten. Remind me again, why are we so obsessed with securing our borders? The threat and bloodshed is exponentially worse within our borders, by our own people. We want to build a wall, but we don’t want to stop mass shootings?

This isn’t a direct attack on partisan politics either way. This is for the entire government, and the people. Over 10,000 Americans are violently killed annually, a number that has not flinched in over three decades. It doesn’t matter who is in the White House, or who has the majority in Congress. And from Columbine going forward, headline after headline after headline shows profile pics of non-minorities behind the attacks. I only bring up race in the context is that we otherwise seem so fearful of foreigners and minorities. Yet, regardless of race/ethnicity/nationality, we are losing too many Americans to violence, and all we seem to do is point fingers.

I would even support the wall if we were already taking concrete steps in other ways to protect our own, at home. And I do NOT mean passing even more ridiculous gun laws. Those work just as well as the wall – makes us feel better about ourselves, while spending a lot of tax dollars, without putting an actual dent in the problem. A problem that is killing 

I don’t want to just feel better about myself. I want to feel better for my fellow citizens. I want to feel better about the future we’re leaving for our children. Eleven school shootings, in under a month. Do the math, there’s an increasing chance that if it hasn’t happened in your community, it will.

Visualizing Gun Violence in 2017

Last year, there were 362 mass shootings, just about one a day, for the entire year. 450 killed, 1869 injured (I downloaded their file and filtered within Excel). And the yearly trend is skyrocketing in the wrong direction.  How is that even acceptable? And yet, for some reason, we are more fearful of ISIS, who has claimed 8 in a car attack in NYC. Don’t get me wrong, we should not let our guard down against foreign extremists. The threat is real. 8 in New York, but over 3,000 worldwide, including war-torn hotbeds like Iraq and Afghanistan.

But we are not at war at home. We should be safe on our own soil. Hundreds of mass shootings, hundreds of fatalities, within one year, last year, says otherwise.

I think the reason we don’t take domestic terror, armed domestic violence, so seriously in the US, is because we don’t want to be victimized by the same abuses of power we use on foreigners in the fight for terror. But that’s already happening, right now. 

Right Now

Breakdown of the US prison population

Right now, the United States has over 2.3 million incarcerated within its borders. We lock up more of our own per capita than Russia or China, Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea, and even Mexico. We lock up more of our own citizens than regimes run by dictators. Despite civil liberties, we experience a disturbing trend of police brutality. And not just within ethnic minority communities. Police have killed 1,147 people in the U.S. in 2017. 526 were White. And while that number is disproportionately lower compared to Black victims, that number is still insanely high compared to any other predominantly-White society. There were only 14 days out of the year that our police forces didn’t kill anyone. England and Wales totaled only 55 police killings, in the past 24 years. Australia totaled 94 since 1991. 

So even if we take the ethnic minorities out of the numbers, the number of White Americans who are either incarcerated or killed by state authorities has no comparison with any other developed nation or superpower. Countries with notorious human rights violations, nations with suppressed democracy and no guaranteed freedoms have better track records. We have sacrificed much to feel safe at home.

And yet, we still had eleven school shootings so far, this month. 

*PS: I am pointing out the statistics of White Americans here, only to illustrate that the problem of armed violence in this country isn’t simply limited to minorities and foreigners, regardless whether we’re looking at the perpetrators, or the victims. This affects ALL of us, no matter who we are, or what we look like.

 

In response to: Kentucky shooting was 3rd at a U.S. school this week

Two students were killed and 16 others injured in the third shooting at a U.S. school this week, and one of at least 11 on school property since Jan. 1.