Do You Know The Bible, or Do You Just Know What You Were Taught About It?
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If you want to argue the Bible with me, make sure you KNOW the Bible. Not just memorized Bible verses that fit your narrative.
 
It’s no secret that I’m not a fan of the King James version of the Bible, mainly because of King James I himself. Unlike Christ, the Unifier of the Three Crowns is very well-documented in history books, and for some reason, we tend to not acknowledge him as the same guy who “wrote” the standard English Bible.

I believe in Christ, but I also believe that much of the Bible, especially the Old Testament, was written by men who claimed to be God’s servants, but were servants of politics and wealth. It annoys me when people quote Leviticus, but don’t know a thing about Leviticus itself. They use his two verses to point out that homosexuality is bad, but ignore the following verses that explicitly state that infidelity in any form is equally as sinful.
 
And yes, the Bible does condone slavery, and even has rules governing the forced servitude of Hebrews. Ironic, considering that it’s in Exodus, which is the story of Moses, God’s Chosen One to free Hebrews from slavery. The greater irony is that the rules of slavery are spelled out in Exodus 21, the chapter immediately after Exodus 20, the Ten Commandments, and of course, the demands of animal sacrifice.  I always found it odd that God Commanded “Thou Shall Not Kill” but “here are the times it’s okay to kill and some approved methods of killing.” Or simply put “Don’t kill unless I tell you to.”
 
I’m not trying to condone slavery. I’m just saying it’s ironic to go through all the trouble to free the Hebrews from slavery, only to tell them how they should be “properly” enslaved, right after giving them the Ten Commandments. “You are free, but this is how you should serve your masters.” I can see why King James was excited about the power of monotheistic religion that strictly enforced unquestioned loyalty and demanded constant sacrifice to anyone appointed by God. If we are going to accept the Bible wholesale, then we have to accept the commoditization of human beings, ritualistic murder, and the servitude of mankind by man. Based on the teachings of Christ, I have serious reservations that God Himself condoned slavery and capitol punishment.
King James I of England and VI of Scotland (1566-1625)

Tell me I’m wrong. Tell me I’m taking entire chapters out of context. But before you call me out, make sure you know what you’re talking about. I’ve been enmeshed in theological discussions and debate since before I graduated high school. Don’t just quote a single verse and expect to win an argument. Be prepared to talk about it. I’m always willing to talk, teach and learn. I’ll share knowledge with Christians, Jews, Hebrews, Muslims, Sikhs, Buddhists, atheists: anyone whose ears are as open as their mouths. But don’t come to argue.

BTW, “interesting” look at the biography of King James. It’s pretty whitewashed, but still “interesting.” LoL

Image credit:  “King James I of England and VI of Scotland (1566–1625)” by  John de Critz the Elder

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