I Support Colin Kaepernick’s Protest
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I support Kap’s protest bc he got many people to pull their collective heads out of the sand, and take action. Not to threaten harm to cops, or incite violence. A call to tackle racism, to call out oppression. And we are seeing more people do just that.

Charlotte, NC – September 18, 2016: San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) walks off the field at Bank of America Stadium with his fist up in the air after their game against the Panthers.(Gerry Melendez for ESPN)

It can’t make America any worse, bc the ones doing the most complaining about Kap aren’t going to actually do anything at all, just like before he started taking a knee. They’re just being louder about their own inactions. We’re too busy complaining about what he’s doing, without a peep about what we ourselves are doing, besides placing our hands on our hearts. Which isn’t helping to reduce the number of vet suicides, or ending corrupt politics, or reduce the insane number of violent deaths we face, where a single city can have a higher murder per capita than nearly all the rest of the developed nations combined. For years, people have taken their voices to the streets, and society did not care about what the media isn’t covering. Now, it’s center stage on our televisions and newsfeeds.

What About Our Veterans?

I don’t think Kap’s being disrespectful to our country or our troops. Many soldiers and vets, like myself, respect his rights to express dissent. He didn’t badmouth the anthem, he didn’t give the finger, he wasn’t belligerent in his display or commentary. I would rather hear someone spit reality than hearing someone reciting romantic notions. He is calling out injustice, by simply kneeling quietly during the Anthem. It is not like burned the flag or pissed on The Declaration of Independence. He simply kneeled.

In fact, it was a war vet, Nate Boyer, who suggested to take a knee as a form of civil disobedience, rather than simply sit on the bench, in order to show more respect to our soldiers and veterans. At Boyer’s suggestion, Colin began taking a knee during the 49ers starting pre-season game on September 1, 2016.

Aren’t His Parents White?

He never claimed that HE was oppressed by white people. He was speaking about systemic injustice against minorities. I honestly don’t know what his ethnicity is, but I do believe everyone, regardless of race, should unequivocally not tolerate racism. Not just the oppressed.

The backlash against him is a reflection of how systemic oppression is in this country. Instead of agreeing racism is wrong, his critics merely mock and ridicule him as if to reinforce that racism doesn’t exist.

Reality Check

I acknowledge that many, if not most, of the people I know are against the protest. Despite what I’ve pointed out above, it’s still unAmerican, it’s still disrespectful to our troops, it’s still inappropriate to inject politics into sports.  We simply disagree on what’s more important.

Why Me?

I don’t support the protest just because I’m Black. My experiences as a disadvantaged minority, my struggles to overcome that label, definitely connect personally to his message.  But I also support him as a military veteran, who is also both a son of a wartime veteran and a father of a currently serving daughter.  

 

Woman’s March 2017

But even if I weren’t Black, even if I had never served, I would still respect and support Colin Kaepernick’s efforts, as a fellow American and human being. I don’t have a vagina, yet I still support many women’s issues being protested today. I’m foreign-born, yet I still support indigenous tribes protesting violations of federal treaties and laws, and their stand to protect their own sovereign rights. I’m an American citizen and California resident who supports sanctuary cities. I’m a born-male heterosexual who openly denounces LGBTQ discrimination and criminalization.  #JusticeForAll isn’t about what’s just for me. It’s about what’s just for all of us.

 

Why We Should All Be Protesting

White People For Black Lives. Reaching out, building bridges

We know that its all fucked up. We know the govt is corrupt, we know cops have quotas. We know private prisons sue us if we don’t completely fill their facilities. We know the govt does not care about our rights to privacy in its war on terror. We know that there are too many ridiculous laws. No matter what our views are, liberal/conservative, rich/middle class/poor, black/white, male/female. We all agree that America is troubled. We all disagree on what’s causing the trouble. And we are too busy fighting over the differences, rather than working together to ease those troubles. Until we can collectively do better, I can individually support trailblazers like Colin Kaepernick who take action, long before it’s popular. His silent act of civil disobedience has inspired other players in the league to get involved. And we’ve seen it spread to other sports, from high school baseball games to European soccer players. He inspires peace over violence, calm over anger, civility over brutality. In light of the times, every American should be taking notice and following along. And every day, more and more of us are.

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