Tracking the Weighed Dollar
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In fairness to the current President, the sliding de-positioning of the US Dollar has been trending for awhile. Part of it is the cannibalism of American consumerism and another part of it is irresponsible government spending. Keep in mind, Russia and China owned trillions of dollars of American debt even before Obama was elected. A stronger dollar would mean that (theoretically) we could start buying back our debt and taking control of our economy again. Which means that our debtors would no longer be grabbing us by our balls. An “American First” policy just makes it that much easier to unweave the relevance of the US Dollar from the global economy. And we don’t need to be completely removed, just excised from emerging lucrative markets like the Middle East, Africa and Southeast Asia.

Strangely enough, there is one boding observation. In the countries where US influences have been reduced or removed, where China or Russia has emerged into, we are seeing a noticeable turn for the better in those regional economies. Nothing comes to mind better than west Africa, especially Nigeria. In countries where we’ve partnered with, we don’t have a great track record for economic development. Remember when Yemen was an emerging economy in the early 1990’s and we stepped in with tons of money and military support as a partner in the fight against terror? It has since become a hotbed of Islamic terror, the country has been ravaged by it. And now that we’re abandoning it as a lost cause, China is investing in infrastructure – it’s a country to watch over the next decade.


Source: Adjustment Is Hard, Especially if it Involves the Dollar

Trump’s tax cut has not, to date, unleashed a wave of global demand for U.S. dollar assets.In fact, the dollar weakened as prospects for the tax cut—…