Trying to Break The Stereotypes
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People complain “why can’t you just post that they were just people who did great things? Why do you have to point out they were Black?”

Because there are too many posts already circulating that show Black Americans very negatively. When we talk about welfare abuse, we don’t talk about Americans abusing welfare, we talk about Blacks abusing welfare. We assume that the drug dealer is Black, or that the Black guy is the drug dealer. The social consciousness sees the Black person as a dangerous threat, a menace. Trayvon Martin was hunted down by an armed vigilante because he seemed like a threat. Kalif Browder was locked up in Rikers for years, for a crime he didn’t commit, without ever getting an arraignment. The media focuses on the violence against Blacks as an expected outcome, and we have been programmed to believe that’s our reality.

So I feel obligated to show a more diverse, more relatable view of Black America. Not to show that we are any better than the rest of America. But as a reminder that we are as much a part of America. We are integral to American society, we are vital to American history. And we are indispensable to the future of America. Not because we are Black, but because we are Americans. The fact that people complain about the positive portrayal of Blacks is the very reason we need to keep doing it. Our children need to know about our contributions, and so do the rest of America. Just like everyone else, #BlackLivesMatter. I feel obligated to show the many examples of why and how that you’ve probably never heard of before.

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