When Addicts Play the Victims
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We keep expecting our govt to create more jobs jobs jobs yet our consumer habits are fueling the practices that eliminate them. We don’t buy American. we don’t support unions, we stopped buying GE & Curtis Mathis and spend on Fujitsu and LGE (which we used to remember as Lucky Goldstar). We gripe at corporations for outsourcing call centers but we bemoan the ones who do keep the jobs at home for having higher rates than their competition. Look at your celphone bill, your service and call and see who you get. Same thing with cable. Some of us will pay a little more for the mytholigical organic foods, but we won’t do the same for domestic products and services that would stimulate our economy.

Not to be too xenophobic, but when we buy products that are manufactured overseas, that’s where our American dollars go, to the payrolls of foreign workers, their families, and their communities, instead of our own. As long as they’ll do it for cheaper, we’ll keep spending in their direction. And I doubt if they’re spending as much on Levis and Jack Daniels as we are spending on Ikea and Hondas. I remember when a Dodge was cheap, and you had to pay extra for a Toyota. I grew up in the era where WalMart was pushing “Made In America” marketing, with flags on the tags of nearly every item in the store, before it incorporated. We are focused on the economic numbers on the news like it’s some exotic magic crystal ball, but it’s telling us what we already know but just don’t pay attention to. NASA just scuttled the shuttle program due to economic concerns. But I ask: what is more burdensome: a flagship program that inspired Americans to envision a better tomorrow and push the technological boundaries of our industries, or the displacement of thousands of

NASA just scuttled the shuttle program due to economic concerns. But I ask: what is more burdensome: a flagship program that inspired Americans to envision a better tomorrow and push the technological boundaries of our industries, or the displacement of thousands of analysts, engineers, manufacturers, programmers, crewmen, educators, designers, managers, support members and other well-paying CAREER jobs back into the unemployment line that’s already far too backlogged? I mean, what other comparable jobs await these people as they transition out? Well, at least in the United States? I’m sure India, China, Russia, Italy (the ESA), Japan are hiring and can capitalize on the decades of proven experience our men and women and dedicated their lives to. Yes, we’re switching to the privatization of the space industry, but those jobs aren’t there NOW, and those corporations aren’t American or American funded.

That’s just one sector of one industry.  But there is no more Curtis Mathis, GE, IBM (replaced by Lenovo), ARCO is now owned by BP (remember when California had the cheapest gas in America? Remember when that changed?), Chrysler (Fiat), and even our own Apple iPods are manufactured by FoxxCon, a Korean company, employing their own domestic workforce to keep up with our insatiable demands. We are aggressively creating jobs. Just not in our own country. We can keep blaming the powers that be, but that’s just ignoring our own accountabilities when it comes to the one thing we can control, how we spend our almighty American Dollar.

Why should we wait for the government to pass laws to force us to change our spending habits, especially if we’re fighting them tooth and nail against it? Because we can’t afford it? Well, look where “can’t afford it” has gotten us, and look where it continues to take us.

I’m not suggesting we give up foreign spending altogether. We can’t . Besides we owe those countries too much money. But i do encourage that we be more practical in our day-to-day spending. Industries should promote “Buy Quality American” not because we need the jobs, but because we can make great shit. If we’re going to have a habit, let’s give up the electronic crank and go for some primo digital coke. Okay, not a good example, since the crappiest meth was probably made by your next door neighbor, while the crunchiest powder couldn’t have come from anywhere else but fresh from the drying houses in Columbia.

Well, at least we have our own crappy pharmaceutical industry to fuel our lagging economy. Pretty damn sad.

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