Wonder Woman
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Refreshingly fun and smart for a superhero movie. It’s Wonder Woman done right. They cut out a lot of the cringeworthy typecast moments we saw in the trailers. It’s definitely about women empowerment, but i would say its about self-empowerment from a woman’s perspective. Because Steve Trevor and his band of renegade misfits have to contend with their own sense of empowerment and limitations.

It’s less preachy and more grounded about sensitive issues. It doesnt lump the struggles of an entire race or gender or religion into single characters. It takes relatable characters and shows how they have to struggle with perceptions and prejudices as obstacles in the way of larger goals. For example, Chief isnt the poster child for the Native American suffering under the White Man, but he isnt ignorant of it either. Outside of the villains, there are (almost) no stereotypes in this story.

Thor’s origin film was about a spoiled brat who learned the hard way about what it means to be a god among mortals. Diana’s is about a empassioned idealist who learned the hard way about the very same thing. Without the “Gee, this is harder than i thought” cheeze. Thankfully, much of the patronizing is excised from the story.

I love how the reality of that world is, as Trevor put it, “it’s not just about one man.” While there is a villain, and even an evil god, evil isnt a singular concept. We tend to latch blame onto symbols and people we don’t like, but the reality is that it’s not so simple. Getting rid of one madman isnt going to end war or violence. As the villain points out, he merely provided the gun, but he never told anyone to pull the trigger.

Patty Jenkins is worth keeping an eye on.

It is smart. At the very least, it’s thoughtful. Kudos to Gal Gadot for not just doing justice to a role, but bringing the life to Wonder Woman. The supporting cast really rounded out well. Chris Pine could have phoned this in.

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